Take a look at some of Elliot's reviews below!



FIDDLER ON THE ROOF

"Elliot Lane, as the Fiddler, proved himself to be one of the finest talents on a stage filled with talent. His look, his musical abilities, his sensitivity to Tevya and his plight, all together created a unity that this show has always lacked for me. If there are awards for local productions, and I do believe there are, the tributes to him and the director for using him in this way should be manifold." (J. Peter Bergman;) www.berkshirebrightfocus.com

RING OF FIRE (MRT)

"While the entire ensemble was of top quality, I thought the work of Elliot Lane was particularly impressive. He did the most acting and was the Johnny Cashiest of the bunch with a dead on vocal mimicry of the singer. Lane really shone in numbers such as a gutbusting rendition of A Boy Named Sue and Flesh and Blood. Not only was Lane an ace performer, he also proved himself an incredible instrumentalist as he floated between playing guitar, electric mandolin, and just sizzled on the violin." (Chris' Corner) www.creatingcontemplation.wordpress.com

THE SECRET GARDEN

"Leenya Rideout and Elliot Lane bring tour-de-force performances as brother and sister, Martha and Dickon, respectively. Their energy, warmth, and compassion bring a new level of fun to the stage. When the two join Brittany Ross and other cast members for the spirited number “Come Spirit, Come Charm,” you can’t help but smile." (Will Gallagher; Discover Albany)

"Elliot Lane brings energy and power to the role of Dicken, whose intensity sometimes suggests he’s a Martin McDonagh character-in-waiting." (Bob Goepfert) www.troyrecord.com

SHREK, the musical

"Elliot Lane in the title role is a sight to behold. He has endeared himself to the Arundel audience in Andrews Brothers and Chicago, and he takes hold of this role with a firm grip. His gorgeous voice and loveable if misunderstood SHREK will keep you engaged throughout. His touching "When Words Fail" and "Who I'd Be" will tug at your heart strings, as will "Build A Wall"." (Scott Moreau) www.broadwayworld.com

PUTTING IT TOGETHER

"Mr. Lane’s voice is beautiful and has a lot of range. His vocals really shine in "Marry Me A Little" and I enjoyed this immensely. Mr. Lane’s professional phrasing in the delivery of his lyrics also warrant mentioning. Not only is this a plus for audience members to capture the lyrics, it is also a necessity when performing a Sondheim number. This phrasing make his musical numbers particularly enjoyable and beautiful, and are a strong point in the show." (Nathan Goulart-Pasco; Nathan's Theatre Blog)

"Her swain, Lane, delivers on all of his songs, especially "Pretty Women" and "Live Alone and Like It." He steps forward from the ensemble exhibiting warmth and charm galore." (J. Peter Bergman) www.berkshirebrightfocus.com

THE MUSIC MAN

"...they suddenly walk in rhythm and sing pure "barbershop" including the almost counter-tenor of ultra-handsome Elliot Lane, who blends his high notes with the middle-voices of Griffith Whitehurst, Ben Darragh and Chris Bober."(J. Peter Bergman) www.berkshirebrightfocus.com

ALL SHOOK UP

"Elliot Lane as Dean is the quintessential boy next door, looking to get out from under his mother's thumb. He removed the green mask he donned last week as Shrek to show you the sincere and sweet Dean beneath. His voice, though proven and fantastic throughout his other roles this summer, never falters." (Scott Moreau) www.broadwayworld.com

THE ANDREWS BROTHERS

"Elliot Lane's endearing portrayal of Patrick keeps the audience "awwww!!!"-ing out loud, as you root for him to overcome his extremely convincing stutter, and to succumb to Peggy's advances." (Scott Moreau) www.broadwayworld.com

CHICAGO

"Standout performances Wednesday included Elliot Lane (Sgt. Fogarty/Martin Harrison/Velma Trio/Roxie’s Boys/Company) as the announcer" (April Boyle) Portland Press Herald

"Not to be left out is Elliot Lane in a slew of ensemble roles, but most noticeably as the Announcer and framing Velma and Roxie. He is perhaps the strongest male dancer on stage, and moves through the Fosse-esque choreography with ease." (Scott Moreau) www.broadwayworld.com